Hayes Scholar Tamryn Fowler Traveled to Seattle for Unique Educational Opportunity

Fowler,Tamryn

Tamryn Fowler

Last November, Tamryn Fowler, BSN ’09 and a current student in the MSN program at the SON, traveled with Dean and Alumni Distinguished Professor Kristen Swanson, PhD, to the Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, WA. Her trip was supported by the Hayes Fund, a fund created by Art Odom in memory of his mother Annie Lathan Odom Hayes. The fund is unrestricted and can be used at the discretion of the School of Nursing Dean. Tamryn has generously shared some reflections with us from her experience in Seattle.

Traveling to Seattle as a graduate student was a dynamic, once-in-a-lifetime experience. To be able to fly across the country to embark on a new learning opportunity was incredible. When I first arrived in Seattle, I remember riding in a ferry boat, saying to myself, “It is late at night, and I am riding in a ferry boat with the Dean. This is surreal!” It is difficult to explain the extent of gratefulness that I have toward Dean Swanson and my UNC School of Nursing family. I have only rode in a plane a handful of times in my life, but flying to Seattle last November changed my perspective of myself, my goals, and the meaning of investing in others.

The Dean saw this trip as an opportunity for me to learn more about the role of clinical nurse leaders at the Virginia Mason Medical Center. My academic pursuits in the graduate program are focused on being a nurse educator as well as a clinical nurse leader. Dean Swanson knew that Virginia Mason is a pioneer in executing the clinical nurse leader role in healthcare institutions. I learned how Virginia Mason recognized breakdowns in a patient’s healthcare experience, care fragmentations, and uncoordinated care, and how, in 2004, they began enhancing the effectiveness of front-line nurses, preventing redundancy in clinical practice, and promoting efficiency in coordinating patient care by introducing clinical nurse leaders at Virginia Mason.

I visited Seattle for three full days in November. I first attended the Virginia Mason Model of Care Inpatient Services Retreat, at which I had the privilege of hearing Dean Swanson speak about her theory, the Swanson Caring Theory, in front of hospital employees, including social workers, nurses, clinical nurse leaders, nurse manager, and patient care technicians. As a group, we talked about the organizational context for caring, recalled the five principles of the Swanson Caring Theory, described the phenomenon of compassion fatigue and associated coping strategies, and thought about ways to foster actions of caring on a unit-level.

This retreat reminded me that I am a part of something greater. Nurses have moments when we are hard-pressed from caring for severely-ill patients, but we must remember the beauty of connection and the privilege we have in being able to care for others every day. Dean Swanson emphasized the importance of believing in yourself, trusting your teammates, and honoring each individual you encounter. Listening to the staff’s personal patient stories and the Dean speaking about her theory, I was reminded that I have a purpose to care for others, advocate for them, and figure out what patients need and what they are going through. The Dean demonstrated how we are all the faces, hands, heart, and head of the hospital’s mission. I talked with several clinical nurse leaders at the retreat and learned firsthand what it means to be the keepers of a patient’s story. Patients rely on clinical nurse leaders to tell their story, their struggles, their needs, and promote a continuity of care for them.

On the last day, I met with Kelsey Rounds, a wonderful clinical nurse leader at Virginia Mason. He allowed me to shadow him to learn what a typical day is like for him.  It was a post-surgical floor, and we encountered many different patients with various needs. Kelsey mirrored confidence, resourcefulness, strong listening skills, problem-solving capabilities, creativity, and translated information effectively for all team members to understand the patient’s care. His role focused on ensuring safe verbal hand-offs among staff, making recommendations, organizing team rounding, demonstrating critical thinking, clinical judgment, as well as good follow-up and note-taking. He recognized the importance of listening to various perspectives while keeping the patient’s needs in the forefront.

I am incredibly thankful to the family of Ms. Annie Lathan Odom Hayes for providing me with the Hayes Award.  As the first recipient, I am very appreciative and absorbed everything during my visit to Seattle. I am grateful for the UNC School of Nursing family for organizing this trip, advocating on my behalf, and investing in me. This experience outlines the importance of constantly bringing your best self forward in all situations because you never know how your purpose in life will help someone else.

Thank you!

Beth Black Receives NIH Funding to Study End of Life Care

Beth Black, PhD, RN

Assistant Professor has received funding from the National Institute of Nursing Research at NIH for her grant entitled “End-of-Life Care After Severe Fetal Diagnosis.” The grant is for $407,000 over 2 years to study the implementation of a perinatal palliative care program at the UNC Center for Maternal and Infant Health, and responses to a life-threatening fetal diagnosis by women, their partners and health care providers. Dr. , Cary C. Boshamer Professor, is a co-investigator and is a research adviser to the study.  

 
“We need to learn how to support these families in the best way possible. The way to learn is to talk to them, to find out what they need, identify their grief trajectory, and find out how they do after the loss,” Dr. Black says. In the long term, Dr. Black wants her work to provide a good theoretical foundation for the development of interventions for these families. She also wants to align perinatal issues with the end of life care issues conceptually. “I’m really committed to the care of these families. I want to find out from them and from their providers how we can best care for them in this heartbreaking situation.”
 
Look for more on Dr. Black’s work in the next issue of .

School of Nursing Ranking Climbs to #4 Among Graduate Schools

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing tied for fourth in the 2011 U.S. News and World Report Best Graduate School rankings. This is a move up from its tie for fifth place in 2007, the last time the publication ranked graduate-level nursing programs.

The School’s average assessment score of 4.5 matched that of the University of California-San Francisco and placed it just under Johns Hopkins University, University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Washington, which all tied for first with a score of 4.6. The U.S. News and World Report rankings are based on the ratings of peer academic experts and will appear in the 2012 edition of “Best Graduate Schools.”

SON  also ranked in the top ten for several nursing specialties. It tied for fourth in the psychiatric/mental health clinical nurse specialist category, placed tenth for pediatric nurse practitioner, and was sixth for nursing service administration. See all the nursing rankings here.

Read the rest of this entry »

Watch the “I am a Carolina Nurse” Video

Share the link to the video with your friends: http://wp.me/pb6Ou-oS.

Being a “Carolina Nurse” has many dimensions.  This 7-minute video tells the story from the perspective of students, alumni, faculty, SON and hospital leaders who all experience the quality, energy and emotion of being connected to one of the leading Schools of Nursing in the United States.  Unrestricted private gifts made this video possible and we are grateful to our alumni and friends who provide on-going support to the School.  For giving opportunities, please contact Director of Advancement Norma_Hawthorne@unc.edu

Dean Swanson Talks about Healing After Miscarriage

In a Q&A on the yahoo.com site “Shine,” Dr. Kristen Swanson, Dean of the Chapel Hill School of Nursing discusses the process of healing after a miscarriage.

In the article, Dean Swanson says, “One of the first things I say to couples who come to see me is that when you lose something, you have to name it for yourself to know what it is. You also have to allow your partner to name for his or herself. Usually, for the mother—it’s the loss of a child that is the hardest. Interestingly, for a lot of partners, their biggest loss is their access to their partner, this feeling of “I wish I could do something to lift her out of this but I don’t know what to do.”

Read the complete article: On Lisa Ling’s new website, women find ways to cope with tragedy

Dean Swanson: linking teacher’s miscarriage to fight and fall may be premature

Kristen M. Swanson, PhD, RN, FAAN

A high school Spanish teacher in New York City miscarried last week after she fell to the ground while breaking up a fight between two students. ABC.com interviewed the Dean of the UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Kristen Swanson about the incident in the story Teacher Breaks Up Fight, and Miscarries (Swanson is in the text story, not the video).

In the story, Dean Swanson, who is an expert in miscarriage, comments:

 Batista faces a “constant coming to terms with loss. It’s a death of a life that was short. It’s a death that’s a bit confusing, because you never got to meet the person you’re grieving. But you’re also grieving the loss of yourself as a mother or dad and the scenario around it that never gets to be,” she said.

“We don’t know what ultimately could have caused it,” she said. “It could very easily have been that there was a silent miscarriage happening all along and it just began to complete itself at that time — coincidental to it, not caused by it.”

Dean Swanson comments on Bush’s miscarriage on Time.com

Dean Kristen Swanson

In a story on Time.com, UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing Dean Kristen Swanson comments on George W. Bush talking about the miscarriage his mother had when he was a teenager:

“Let’s put ourselves in Barbara Bush’s position,” says Kristen Swanson, the study’s lead investigator and a nurse who is also dean of the nursing school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). “She’s home, bleeding, cramping and passes the fetus. She scoops it up, puts it in a jar and says, Drive me to the hospital. She says to her son, I’m in the middle of a miscarriage, and this is the fetus that I just passed. There is nothing sinister in this.”

Read the complete article: George W. Bush, His Mom and Her Fetus: Not So Weird After All. Swanson is an expert on miscarriage and how couples respond emotionally to it. She began her work on miscarriage 25 years ago with her dissertation, “The Unborn One: A Profile of The Human Experience of Miscarriage,” and has continued studying this area both as an investigator and as a consultant to other researchers’ works. 
Read the rest of this entry »

Dean Kristen Swanson Featured on Radio Show

Dean Kristen Swanson

Dean and Alumni Distinguished Professor Kristen M. Swanson was the featured guest on the Sept. 11 YOUR HEALTH radio talk show. She talked about the Swanson Theory of Caring, updated listeners on the nursing shortage, and discussed issues facing nurses and nursing education today.

YOUR HEALTH is a weekly one hour radio talk show on patient health produced by the University of North Carolina Department of Family Medicine. The show is co-hosted by Dr. Adam Goldstein and Dr. Cristy Page.

Listen to the radio show here: http://yourhealthradio.org/listen-to-the-show/.

ABC News Features Dean Swanson’s Research on Miscarriage

ABC News posted an article Dec. 10, 2009, about the emotions that surround miscarriage and early pregnancy loss. The story explores the reactions and feelings experienced by several couples and includes analysis and data from  experts, including School of Nursing Dean Kristen M. Swanson.

In the article, Swanson discusses the intensity of emotions associated with a pregnancy loss and how male and female partners experience the loss in different ways. Through her research, she said, she has found that women experience a pregnancy loss in very vivid terms, and their partners feel the loss more vaguely.

Swanson recently published a study about the benefits of nurse-led counseling for couples experiencing miscarriage and early pregnancy loss in the August issue of the Journal of Women’s Health and Gender-Based Medicine.

Dean Kristen M. Swanson’s Latest Study Featured on Conceive Magazine Web site

Dean Kristen M. Swanson recently published a study in the Journal of Women’s Health and Gender-Based Medicine about the best counseling methods to help couples who have recently

Conceive Magazine Web site today published an article about Dean Kristen M. Swanson's latest study about the benefits of nurse-led counseling sessions for couple recently suffering a miscarriage or pregnancy loss.

Conceive Magazine Web site today published an article about Dean Kristen M. Swanson's latest study on the benefits of nurse-led counseling sessions for couple recently suffering a miscarriage or pregnancy loss.

suffered a miscarriage or early pregnancy loss to process their emotions and grief. Her research determined that couples are best helped by participating in nurse-led counseling sessions.

A stand-alone article about her research was published on the Conceive Magazine Web site today, Sept. 23, 2009. The magazine has a circulation of nearly 200,000 readers. To read the article click here:

http://conceiveonline.com/fertility-news/heal-after-a-miscarriage/

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 96 other followers

%d bloggers like this: