Dean Swanson Talks about Healing After Miscarriage

In a Q&A on the yahoo.com site “Shine,” Dr. Kristen Swanson, Dean of the Chapel Hill School of Nursing discusses the process of healing after a miscarriage.

In the article, Dean Swanson says, “One of the first things I say to couples who come to see me is that when you lose something, you have to name it for yourself to know what it is. You also have to allow your partner to name for his or herself. Usually, for the mother—it’s the loss of a child that is the hardest. Interestingly, for a lot of partners, their biggest loss is their access to their partner, this feeling of “I wish I could do something to lift her out of this but I don’t know what to do.”

Read the complete article: On Lisa Ling’s new website, women find ways to cope with tragedy

Dean Swanson: linking teacher’s miscarriage to fight and fall may be premature

Kristen M. Swanson, PhD, RN, FAAN

A high school Spanish teacher in New York City miscarried last week after she fell to the ground while breaking up a fight between two students. ABC.com interviewed the Dean of the UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Kristen Swanson about the incident in the story Teacher Breaks Up Fight, and Miscarries (Swanson is in the text story, not the video).

In the story, Dean Swanson, who is an expert in miscarriage, comments:

 Batista faces a “constant coming to terms with loss. It’s a death of a life that was short. It’s a death that’s a bit confusing, because you never got to meet the person you’re grieving. But you’re also grieving the loss of yourself as a mother or dad and the scenario around it that never gets to be,” she said.

“We don’t know what ultimately could have caused it,” she said. “It could very easily have been that there was a silent miscarriage happening all along and it just began to complete itself at that time — coincidental to it, not caused by it.”

Students and Faculty Volunteer at Project Homeless Connect

Eric Hodges (left) was one of the School of Nursing faculty members that volunteered at Project Homeless Connect. Photo by Laura Shmania, http://www.butterflites.com

The UNC School of Nursing served the community through Project Homeless Connect on Nov. 4. This one-stop event at the Hargraves Community Center in Chapel Hill provided services such as job-readiness resources, health and dental care, mental health assistance, social services, legal services and  housing to people experiencing or at risk of experiencing homelessness. Project Homeless Connect  is a key initiative of the Orange County Partnership to End Homelessness and has served nearly 600 guests since 2007.

SON Associate Dean for Community Partnerships & Practice, Sonda Oppewal, acted as a Co-Chair for Project Homeless Connect’s Health Committee. She solicited ideas from SON faculty about how the School might be involved, bringing some new ideas and services to the event.  For example, guests were guided to relevant health services using new health intake forms developed by SON. The forms facilitated the use of clinical judgment based on interviews with the guests about past and current health problems.

Oppewal also helped assure there were sufficient health care providers, a need that SON helped meet with three nurse practitioners — Clinical Instructor Carrie Palmer, Clinical Assistant Professor and MSN Coordinator Jean Davison and Clinical Assistant Professor Victoria Cryer. Guests with high blood pressures, high cholesterol or glucose were directed to the nurse practitioners for counseling and referral (if needed).

Clinical Instructor Louise Fleming served as an active member of the Health Committee and recruited students to participate. Other faculty who participated included Clinical Associate Professor Eric Hodges, Clinical Assistant Professor Liska Lackey, Clinical Assistant Professor Diane Yorke, Dean Kristen Swanson, and Clinical Instructor Angela Clark. Clinical Assistant Professor Megan Williams also supported the project as the advisor to ANS.

Before the event SON Association of Nursing Students helped collect toiletry kits that were distributed before Nov. 4 as part of outreach efforts to tell homeless people about Project Homeless Connect.  During the event 27 students assisted with intake forms, providing health information, helping with eye exams, and assisted in escorting guests to various stations. Students also gave manicures this year, which provided a new opportunity for therapeutic communication and health education reinforcement. A health bingo game was another new feature that  reinforced  health education.

Sara Smith, a senior BSN student helped give manicures. She said that the event was a great opportunity to help and volunteer. She had not participated before and was surprised by the number of children and women that made up the the homeless population of Chapel Hill.

UNC faculty and students helped with many of the stations at the Project Homeless Connect event. They assisted with health histories and intake, provided health information, gave manicures, took blood pressure, and assisted in escorting guests to various stations.

Sara Smith, a senior BSN student helped give manicures. She said that the event was a great opportunity to help and volunteer. She had not participated before and was surprised by the number of children and women that made up the the homeless population of Chapel Hill.  She said it was an eye-opening experience.

Sara Smith, a senior BSN student helped give manicures. She said that the event was a great opportunity to help and volunteer. She had not participated before and was surprised by the number of children and women that made up the the homeless population of Chapel Hill. She said it was an eye-opening experience.

 

Dean Kristen Swanson Featured on Radio Show

Dean Kristen Swanson

Dean and Alumni Distinguished Professor Kristen M. Swanson was the featured guest on the Sept. 11 YOUR HEALTH radio talk show. She talked about the Swanson Theory of Caring, updated listeners on the nursing shortage, and discussed issues facing nurses and nursing education today.

YOUR HEALTH is a weekly one hour radio talk show on patient health produced by the University of North Carolina Department of Family Medicine. The show is co-hosted by Dr. Adam Goldstein and Dr. Cristy Page.

Listen to the radio show here: http://yourhealthradio.org/listen-to-the-show/.

Kristen M. Swanson, SON’s Sixth Dean, Takes Helm on Aug. 1, 2009

Karen M. Swanson, RN, PhD, FAAN, is Alumni Distinguished Professor and Dean of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing. She is renowned for developing the Swanson Theory of Caring – a theory that names and defines five characteristics of caring. She is also an active Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Fellow and is a member of the American Academy of Nurses, the American Nurses Association, the Council of Nurse Researchers and Sigma Theta Tau International. Before coming to the SON, she pursued research and academic interests at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle for 25 years.

Kristen M. Swanson, PhD, RN, FAAN, began her term as the sixth dean for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing on Aug. 1, 2009

Kristen M. Swanson, PhD, RN, FAAN, began her term as the sixth dean for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing on Aug. 1, 2009

“I came to the School of Nursing because I saw the commitment of administration, faculty, staff and students to ‘getting it right.’ There is clear evidence of integrity, a passion for excellence, openness to collaboration and a sense of pride in knowing that the work here makes a difference,” Swanson said. “The School’s values and mission match my personal and professional beliefs about nursing education, clinical research and the delivery of care.”

Swanson earned her bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Rhode Island and continued with her academic pursuits, culminating with a master’s degree in adult health and illness nursing from the University of Pennsylvania and a PhD in psychosocial nursing from the University of Colorado. She completed her postdoctoral work at the University of Washington. In addition to holding a faculty position at the University of Washington, she taught at Trenton State College, the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and the University of Colorado School of Nursing.

Swanson’s particular area of research interest is in miscarriage and early pregnancy loss. She began this work with her dissertation, “The Unborn One: A

Profile of The Human Experience of Miscarriage,” and has continued studying this area both as an investigator and as a consultant to other researchers’ works. She has been the principal investigator or co-investigator on 10 grants dealing with early pregnancy loss, caring and related topics since 1985. It is during this time that she developed the Swanson Theory of Caring. Since developing the theory, she has consulted with and guided 20 healthcare institutions on the proper way to implement her caring theory in clinical practice.

In recognition of her work, she received an Outstanding Researcher Award from Sigma Theta Tau and has been an invited speaker or visiting professor on multiple occasions, most recently at the National Cheng Kung University in Tainan, Taiwan in 2007. In 2002, she was awarded the University of Rhode Island College of Nursing Distinguished Alumni Award. She is also on the editorial board or serves as a reviewer for the Journal of Nursing Scholarship, Nursing Outlook, Research in Nursing and Health and the International Journal of Human Caring.

New Dean Recommended for School of Nursing

Recommended candidate for Dean, School of Nursing, Dr. Kristen Swanson
Recommended candidate for Dean, School of Nursing, Dr. Kristen Swanson

Dr. Kristen M. Swanson, a nationally recognized professor and chair of the family and child nursing department at the University of Washington, will be recommended as dean of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.

Chancellor Holden Thorp told the University’s Board of Trustees today (May 28) that they soon would receive a recommendation for approval of Swanson’s appointment by mail ballot. She just accepted the position. The effective date would be Aug. 1.

“Dr. Swanson has earned a national reputation for her teaching, research and contributions to the nursing field,” said Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Bernadette Gray-Little. “She has the right experience and skills to build upon an already excellent School of Nursing that is committed to helping meet the health-care needs of North Carolinians. Our nursing students, faculty and staff would get a wonderful successor for Linda Cronenwett.”

Cronenwett will step down in July after a decade as dean and return to the faculty next year as a professor.

In Seattle, Swanson is the University of Washington Medical Center Term Professor in Nursing Leadership. She joined the faculty in 1987 and has chaired the family and child nursing department since 2000.

A fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, Swanson is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellows Program, an advanced leadership initiative for nurses in senior executive roles who aspire to lead and shape the future U.S. health care system.

Swanson’s research has focused on caring, responses to miscarriage, and interventions to promote healing after early pregnancy loss. She developed a theory of caring that she and others have replicated or tested with individuals, families and groups experiencing a variety of health challenges. Swanson’s caring theory has been incorporated into practice and education models in health-care settings around the world. Her most recent research, funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health, was a clinical trial examining the effectiveness of interventions in resolving the grief and depression of mothers and fathers in the first year after miscarriage.

A native of Rhode Island, Swanson graduated with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Rhode Island in 1975; a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pennsylvania in 1978; and a Ph.D. in nursing from the University of Colorado in 1983.

Her professional experience includes work as a staff nurse at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, a clinical instructor at Trenton State College, an instructor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, and a research associate at the University of Colorado School of Nursing.

Her career with the University of Washington began in 1985 as the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards individually awarded postdoctoral fellow. She became a research assistant professor in 1987, assistant professor in 1989, associate professor in 1993 and full professor and chair in 2000.

The UNC-Chapel Hill School of Nursing was established in 1950 in response to North Carolina’s need for nurses. It was the state’s first nursing school to offer a four-year bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree in nursing and to launch continuing education for nurses. It was also the first school to offer a Ph.D. in nursing, as well as an accelerated bachelor’s degree option for second degree students. Today, the school enrolls about 600 students and is known for its academic programs, research and commitment to clinical and community service in state, national and global communities.

For a photo of Swanson:

http://uncnews.unc.edu/news/health-and-medicine/swanson-recommended-as-school-of-nursing-dean.html

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