Merle Mishel to be Inducted into Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame

Dr. Merle Mishel

Kenan Professor of Nursing Dr. Merle Mishel will be inducted into the 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame recognizes scholars and leaders whose funded program of research has had a long-term impact on the profession and patient/family outcomes. The nomination recognized Dr. Mishel’s more than 20 years of federally funded research and her development of the theory of uncertainty in illness. Dr. Mishel says she is pleased that this award recognizes the importance of nursing research and is honored to have an international organization recognize her work as meaningful.

The scales she developed to help investigators measure uncertainty in illness are used in 30 countries and have been translated into many languages. Dr. Mishel will be inducted into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame at STTI’s 22nd International Nursing Research Congress in Cancun, Mexico, in July.

Read the rest of this entry »

Talking With a Nurse Best Helps Couples Grieving a Pregnancy Loss

Although existing research shows that men and women process grief and recovery from miscarriage or early pregnancy loss differently, they are best able to resolve their loss together if they undergo three one-hour long couple-focused nurse-led counseling sessions, according to a study conducted by Kristen M. Swanson, RN, PhD, FAAN, dean of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.

Published in the most recent issue of the Journal of Women’s Health and Gender-Based Medicine, Swanson’s study, funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, compared three couples-focused interventions to no treatment in order to identify strategies

Dean Kristen M. Swanson recently a study based on her research into how nurse-led counseling helps men and women grieving a pregnancy loss process their emotions.

Dean Kristen M. Swanson recently published a study based on her research into how nurse-led counseling helps men and women grieving a pregnancy loss process their emotions.

to help men and women with the resolution of depression and grief during the first year after miscarriage. This study was the first published randomized clinical trial of interventions to support couples after miscarriage.

“During the study, I found that, while men and women both experience sadness after a pregnancy loss, they are, most often, grieving over different things – while women typically mourn the loss of an unborn child, their husband or partner is more likely to mourn the loss of the relationship he had with the woman as she withdraws into her sadness,” Swanson said. “But even though couples tend to feel distraught over separate aspects of the pregnancy loss, we found that both individuals responded most favorably to an intervention that involved three hour-long counseling sessions with a nurse.”

Existing research shows that 85 percent of couples have limited discussions (if any) about their feelings surrounding miscarriage, even though most women wish to talk about it. In her earlier research, Swanson discovered that at one year after miscarriage, couples are likely to experience decreased emotional and physical intimacy if they have not openly shared their feelings or if the male has not demonstrated his concerns by doing little things to show he cares.

Swanson’s latest study divided 341 couples who were within 12 weeks of miscarrying into three groups – one that received three counseling sessions with a nurse (nurse caring), another that included three video and workbook modules (self caring) and a third that combined one nurse-led session with three self-caring modules (combined caring). A fourth group that received no intervention was included as a control. All interventions were offered at one week, five weeks and 11 weeks after study enrollment.

Each intervention was based on Swanson’s Theory of Caring and Meaning of Miscarriage Model. These frameworks were based on Swanson’s earlier studies with women after miscarriage. The first defines five distinct characteristics of caring relationships and the latter identifies six common issues that confront couples after miscarriage.

Overall, the study showed that while women’s grief  resolution was accelerated by participation in any of the three intervention arms, their resolution of depression was best enhanced through receipt of three one-hour long, couples-focused nurse-led counseling sessions, Men’s responses were more complex. While the men in the nurse caring and control interventions took equally long to resolve their symptoms of depression, men who received either the self or combined caring intervention actually took longer than controls to resolve their depression. Men’s grief resolution, on the other hand, was most rapidly abated among those receiving the combined-caring intervention. Examination of men’s complex responses to treatment suggest that grief (a transitional response to loss) and depression (be it situational or clinical in origin) need to be studied and treated as different emotional responses.

“Through these findings, we saw that the three nursing-led counseling sessions were the most effective way to support the couple as a unit. They provided more time for the nurse and couple to connect and jointly address the meaning of miscarriage in the overall context of their lives,” Swanson said.

All improvements in depression were self-reported. Compared to women in the combined-caring, self-caring, or control arms, women who received three nurse counseling sessions were from 3.0 to 7.9 times more likely to realize a faster decline in their symptoms of depression.

Swanson acknowledges certain limitations to the study: the study sample was predominantly white and all couples were heterosexual. A notable strength of the study was that statistical analysis took into account how each individual’s healing was impacted by their mate’s recovery.

This research was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 5 R01 NR005343.

SON Doctoral Student Studying Feeding in Infants With Congenital Heart Disease

Infants with single ventricle congenital heart disease often experience difficulties with eating, placing them at risk for growth problems and greater morbidity and mortality. School of Nursing doctoral student Britt Pados is conducting a study to determine whether a particular feeding strategy will improve infant development.

In her study, titled “Feeding of Infants with Single Ventricle Heart Disease: Physiology and Behavior, Pados will study seven infants, observing how they react to three different feeding

SON doctoral student Britt Pados is researching the best method to feed infants born with a form of congenital heart disease.

SON doctoral student Britt Pados is researching the best method to feed infants born with a form of congenital heart disease.

methods — breastfeeding, bottle-feeding with a standard-flow nipple and bottle-feeding with a slow-flow nipple. The study has two aims: to examine heart rate and oxygen saturation changes and observe indicators of distress caused by each feeding method and to explore how heart rate variability affects the ability to understand physiological states before, during and after feeding.

The study, supported by a nearly $100,000, three-year Nurse Research Service Award from the National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, is intended to improve quality of life for the patients and help identify the most appropriate feeding strategies for infants with single ventricle congenital heart disease to achieve better growth and avoid complications.

SON Faculty Member Conducts Research in Geriatric Program Highlighted in WUNC Radio Story

Assistant professor Anna Beeber recently received a three-year fellowship in the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) program. The BIRCWH

The North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute recently award Anna Beeber a three-year fellowship to study dementia care as part of the PACE program

The North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute recently award Anna Beeber a three-year fellowship to study dementia care as part of the PACE program.

program is part of the North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute (TraCS). The National Institutes of Health awarded the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill $61 million for TraCS in spring 2008.

Beeber studies dementia care in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). She plans to conduct two mentored projects and an independent study to better understand the relationships between community-based service use and nursing home placement in older adults with dementia. Her long-term goal is to improve community-based dementia service to prevent or delay placement in nursing homes.

WUNC reporter Rose Hoban filed a story today, Aug. 4, about the PACE program, featuring local entities that participate in it. The listen to her story, click here: http://wunc.org/programs/news/archive/NRH0804.mp3/view

Faculty member Barbara Mark Receives $1.6 Million Grant to Impact Healthcare Quality

Distinguished professor Barbara Mark received $1.64 million from the

Distinguished professor Barbara Mark received $1.64 million from the National Institute of Nursing Research to continue a predoctoral and postdoctoral training program.

Distinguished professor Barbara Mark received $1.64 million from the National Institute of Nursing Research to continue a predoctoral and postdoctoral training program.

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health to continue, for five additional years, a predoctoral and postdoctoral training program designed to improve healthcare quality and patient outcomes.

The new funding will support 12 predoctoral and eight postdoctoral trainees, preparing them to focus on clinical outcomes measurement and research translation/health policy.

Mark’s work is influenced by the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) existing criteria for quality health care: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency and equity. It also aligns with a new partnership between the IOM and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation — the Initiative on the Future of Nursing. The new initiative is designed to study, in part, ways to improve healthcare quality through nursing.

SON Rises to 4th in NIH Funding Rankings

This year, the SON reclaimed its spot in the top five nursing schools that receive funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). For 2008, the NIH awarded the School 13 grants, totaling $6.42 million, putting the SON in fourth place. This was an increase from the sixth place ranking from 2007 that included 12 grants and $5.97 million of funding.

International Asian Students Chosen for National Nurse Program

Four international Asian students — Yeonmi Hu, Jinhee Park, Geongok Logan and Hanping Song — have been selected for the National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurses Association’s (NCEMNA) mentor/mentee program. The program is funded by the National Institutes of Health to increase the number of minority nurse researchers. Along with faculty member SeonAe Yeo, RNC, PhD, FAAN, they will attend the NCEMNA’s annual conference in San Diego in March. During the three-day conference, they will meet other minority scholars, learn professional leadership skills, have access to career developments, find future collaborators and network with other international Asian students.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 96 other followers

%d bloggers like this: