Professor Oermann’s Nursing Study Points to Changing the Way We Teach CPR

National League for Nursing: The chances for patient survival are improved with immediate and high quality CPR, making it an especially important skill for nurses, who are often the first responders to cardiac arrests in hospitals. With a finding of quick deterioration of this critical skill for nurses, the study has major implications for how we teach all skills. Results provide evidence for how we can help nursing students and other health providers maintain their basic life support skills.

New York, NY (PRWEB) July 30, 2010

The chances for patient survival are improved with immediate and high quality CPR, making it an especially important skill for nurses, who are often the first responders to cardiac arrests in hospitals. Results of this study provide evidence for how we can help nursing students and other health providers maintain their basic life support (BLS) skills, noted Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, professor and adult/geriatric health chair at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and principal investigator for the nursing student component of the study. Staff nurses and other health care professionals were also included in this large interdisciplinary study, with Suzan Kardong-Edgren, PhD, RN, serving as project director.

Begun in 2008, different approaches to teaching and learning BLS were tested by students at 10 schools of nursing with associate, diploma, or baccalaureate programs. Students completed American Heart Association training in either a four-hour, instructor-led course or through a self-directed, computer-based course (HeartCode™ BLS) that included learning and practice on a voice advisory manikin. After this initial training, students were randomly assigned to a control group with no further practice or to an experimental group, which practiced CPR six minutes each month for the 12 months of the study. The performance of all students, both the control and experimental groups, were tested after three, six, nine, and 12 months to determine their level of skill retention. Students who practiced their CPR psychomotor skills on voice advisory manikins for only six minutes a month either maintained or improved their skills over the 12-month period. In contrast students who did not practice beyond their initial BLS training had a significant loss of skills, some as early as three months after completing it.

In announcing the results, NLN president Dr. Cathleen Shultz said, “The big story may be how many implications there are from this study. One is the manner in which CPR is taught and the comparison of different types of instruction, but the more important findings for nursing education are related to the data on how quickly skills deteriorate. We spend considerable time teaching and evaluating psychomotor skills in the lab, but more often than not, students do not have an opportunity to use the skill anytime close to the time frame in which they learned it. So then they need to relearn when the time comes to use it.”

“There is nothing more critical to student preparation and for the real world challenges of delivering safe, quality care than to maximize the synthesis and integration of knowledge and skill performance. We are grateful to Laerdal for funding this cutting-edge pedagogical inquiry and to the American Heart Association for providing the learning platform,” said NLN CEO Beverly Malone, PhD, RN, FAAN.

An article describing the study will be published in the September/October issue of the NLN’s research journal, Nursing Education Perspectives. In addition, “Comparison of Two Instructional Modalities for Nursing Student CPR Skill Acquisition” by Drs. Marilyn Oermann and Suzan E. Kardong-Edgren has been published in the August issue of Resuscitation.

Reporters/Editors: To arrange interviews, please contact Karen R. Klestzick, NLN chief communications officer, at 212-812-0376.

SON Alum Receives NLN Award for Teaching

Anne Belcher, BSN ’67, will receive the National League for Nursing’s

Anne Belcher, BSN '67, will receive the NLN Excellence in Teaching Award in September.

Anne Belcher, BSN '67, will receive the NLN Excellence in Teaching Award in September.

Excellence in Teaching Award at the upcoming National League for Nursing Education Summit. The meeting will be held in Philadephia on Sept. 26, 2009. Belcher is currently an associate professor and director of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Office for Teaching Excellence. She previously served as the associate dean for academic affairs at Johns Hopkins.

Faculty Member Marilyn Oermann Receives NLN Award

Faculty member and division chair Marilyn Oermann received the National League for Nursing

Faculty member and division chair Marilyn Oermann will receive an NLN award in September.

Faculty member and division chair Marilyn Oermann will receive an NLN award in September.

(NLN) Award for Excellence in Nursing Education Research. Her award will be presented during the awards banquet that will be held during the NLN Education Summit on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2009.

National League for Nursing CEO Malone to Speak in Chapel Hill on the State of Admissions, Diversity

New York, NY — March 3, 2008 — The National League for Nursing’s much anticipated annual Nursing Data Review Academic Year 2005-06 has been released, and this year’s is a decidedly good news/bad news report. It casts a wide lens on all types of pre-licensure nursing programs, including those offering diploma, associate and baccalaureate degrees, to determine rates of application, enrollment and graduation. The review also provides a comprehensive demographic profile of the current student population, documenting ethnic-racial identity, gender, and age. On the positive front, the survey shows a marked increase in the percentage of graduating pre-licensure students who are members of racial or ethnic minority groups, with the increase distributed across all racial and ethnic categories: Asians, African Americans, Hispanics, and American Indians.

“Because research increasingly links minority health disparities to a lack of cultural competence on the part of health care providers, who often differ from their patients with respect to racial-ethnic background, this is a promising finding,” observed NLN CEO Beverly Malone, RN, PhD, FAAN.

Rumay Alexander, EdD, RN, director of multicultural affairs at the UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing, served on the NLN Think Tank on Diversity.

Malone will speak to the nurse educator shortage and other issues on Wednesday, March 19, 2008, 3:00 p.m. at the Carolina Club on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campus.

The NLN reports that applications to RN programs fell a notable 8.7 percent in 2005-06, down from a peak in applications a year earlier. The drop is suspected to be the result of widespread awareness of the difficulty of gaining entry to nursing school, fueled by the continuing crippling shortage of nurse educators. By all indications, unmet demand for placement persists, with 88,000 qualified applications — one in three of all applications submitted — denied. Baccalaureate degree programs turned away 20 percent of its applications, while associate degree programs turned away 32.7 percent.

A PDF of the Executive Summary of Nursing Data Review Academic Year 2005-06

National League for Nursing CEO to Speak, March 19, 2008

Beverly Malone, PhD, RN, FAAN, chief executive officer for the National League for Nursing will present a public lecture as the School’s Visiting Ethnic Minority Scholar for 2008. She will discuss, “Nurse Educators: Essential to the Future of Health Care” on March, 19, 2008, at 3 p.m. in the Carolina Club Alumni Hall on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. A reception honoring the retirement of School of Nursing faculty member Bonnie Angel, BSN `79, EdD, RN, will follow Malone’s presentation.

Dr. Malone’s career has combined policy, education, administration and clinical practice. As a practicing nurse, she has worked as a surgical staff nurse, clinical nurse specialist, director of nursing and assistant administrator of nursing work. President Bill Clinton named her to the U.S. delegation for the World Health Assembly’s roundtable discussion on the Patient Bill of Rights. In addition, Dr. Malone served as deputy assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the highest position so far held by any nurse in the U.S. government. She is also the immediate past general secretary for the Royal College of Nursing in the United Kingdom.

Dr. Bonnie Angel has been a nurse, educator and advisor for more than 40 years. She began her career as a clinical instructor in Concord, N.C., and New Orleans before joining Carolina. She has published work focusing on student academic achievement and has counseled countless nursing students as they prepared for licensing exams. She has also been an active nurse leader, holding positions in the N.C. League for Nursing, the American Nurses Association, and the Chapel Hill Association for Nursing Students. She served for many years as the faculty representative on the Board of Directors of the School’s Alumni Association.

To RSVP, please e-mail Jill Summers at jcsummer@email.unc.edu.

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